The Theological Illiteracy of “Dare We Hope?”

By Clement Harrold Clement Harrold is a British citizen studying at the Franciscan University of Steubenville, majoring in Theology, Philosophy, and Classics, with a minor in German. It has rightly been said that in order to appreciate the “Good News” of salvation we first need to recognize the bad news of damnation. This point appears to have been lost on the likes of Bishop Robert Barron with his echoing of 20th-century Swiss theologian Hans Urs von Balthasar’s suggestion that we might reasonably hope that all men are saved. In a recent Sunday sermon, Barron is careful to affirm that the “fullness of salvation” …

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A Model Pope

By Roberto de Mattei Roberto de Mattei is the author of the upcoming book, Saint Pius V: The Legendary Pope Who Excommunicated Queen Elizabeth I, Standardized the Mass, and Defeated the Ottoman Empire. We have already entered into the “post-Francis” era. The post-Amazon Synod has failed, the Exhortation Querida Amazonia of 2 February 2020 has fallen on deaf ears, and the Exhortation Amoris Laetitia of 8 April 2016 has entered into history more for the criticisms that it received than for the new path which it opened.  The latest initiatives of Pope Francis have been characterized by growing contradictions and increasing confusion, with the flock of …

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Cardinal Burke and Seven Other Princes of the Church Made Cardinal Priests

Edward Pentin began reporting on the Pope and the Vatican with Vatican Radio before moving on to become the Rome correspondent for the Register. He has also reported on the Holy See and the Catholic Church for a number of other publications including Newsweek, Newsmax, Zenit, The Catholic Herald, and The Holy Land Review, a Franciscan publication specializing in the Church and the Middle East. Edward is the author of The Next Pope: The Leading Cardinal Candidates (Sophia Institute Press, 2020) and The Rigging of a Vatican Synod? An Investigation into Alleged Manipulation at the Extraordinary Synod on the Family VATICAN CITY — Cardinals Raymond Burke, Walter Brandmüller, …

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Defense of the Common Good or Collaboration with Evil?

By Stephen Sammut, PhD Stephen Sammut, BPharm, PhD, is a Professor of Psychology at Franciscan University of Steubenville. Dr. Sammut received a BPharm from Monash University in Victoria, Australia and a PhD in Neuroscience from the University of Malta. For more than 20 years Dr. Sammut has conducted varied research in animal models to investigate questions related to psychopathology, including depression, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease, and drug abuse. One thing can be stated for certain—the COVID-19 scar on humanity will be clearly visible for many years to come. If immediate steps are not taken to counter the narrative of misinformation as well …

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Lord David Alton Is Not Remaining Silent on China and Human Rights

K.V. Turley is the Register’s U.K. correspondent. He writes from London. LONDON — On March 26, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) imposed sanctions on the British Catholic parliamentarian Lord David Alton.  The reason? He had highlighted widespread human-rights abuses in the Chinese province of Xinjiang. The Chinese authorities imposed these measures on Alton and eight other British citizens, as well as on four institutions, all deemed critical of China’s human rights’ record. Alton told the Register April 20, “These sanctions have been imposed as a crude attempt to intimidate and silence parliamentarians.”  He added, “Those who have been sanctioned have been …

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Fetal-Tissue Research: Bioethicists Weigh in on Biden Administration’s Removal of Restrictions

Experts outline the costs of disregarding the ethical considerations of such research. Lauretta Brown is the Register’s Washington-based staff writer. WASHINGTON — Former members of the Trump-era National Institutes of Health (NIH) Human Fetal Tissue Research Ethics Advisory Board and a pro-life expert on the topic are speaking out against the Biden administration’s recent decision to remove the requirement that the board review human fetal-tissue research from elective abortions.  In addition to highlighting the importance of ethical considerations, they also pointed out past ethical violations on the part of researchers that demonstrate the continuing need for such a review board. …

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To Rise With Christ, We Must Die With Christ

Prof. Michael Ogunu is the Coordinator of the World Apostolate of Fatima in Africa “No slave is greater than his master. If they persecuted me, they will also persecute you.” (John 15:20) Throughout the history of the Church, from the time of the Roman persecutions until the present, Christians have been called upon to suffer and die for the Faith if situations demand it. The martyrdom of the Apostles and their contemporaries is proof of the historical reality of the Gospel story. For the Apostles were willing to attest in their blood what they had seen, what they had heard, …

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The Pro-Life Argument of ‘The Guns of Navarone’

John M. Grondelski (Ph.D., Fordham) is the former associate dean of the School of Theology, Seton Hall University, South Orange, New Jersey. He is especially interested in moral theology and the thought of John Paul II The Guns of Navarone is the epic adventure of six Allied saboteurs dispatched to knock out two large caliber German guns positioned within a natural rock fortress on the fictional Greek island of Navarone. The mission is undertaken so that British warships can safely pass the island to rescue British troops stranded on a neighboring island, Kheros (also fictional).  The movie, based on the Alistair …

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How might the pandemic affect religious practice? A look at the current data

Filip Mazurczak is a journalist, translator, and historian. His writing has appeared in the National Catholic Register, First Things, Tygodnik Powszechny, and other publications. There is much pessimism across the West about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on religious practice. Luxembourg’s Cardinal Jean-Claude Hollerich, for example, has grimly predicted that the disruption of normal religious life may have accelerated the secularization of Europe by a decade. If this proves true for Europe, the same phenomena will likely occur, in some way and to some degree, in North America, Australia, and other outposts of Western culture. A close look at some sociological research from …

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Five reasons to read Dei Verbum—and five things you’ll learn in doing so

Dr. Leroy Huizenga is Administrative Chair of Arts and Letters and Professor of Theology at the University of Mary in Bismarck, N.D. Dr. Huizenga has a B.A. in Religion from Jamestown College (N.D.), a Master of Divinity from Princeton Theological Seminary, and a Ph.D. in New Testament from Duke University. During his doctoral studies, he received a Fulbright Grant to study and teach at Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt, Germany. After teaching at Wheaton College (Ill.) for five years, Dr. Huizenga was reconciled with the Catholic Church at the Easter Vigil of 2011. Dr. Huizenga is the author of The New Isaac: …

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