Fr. Rutler’s Guide to Virtue-Signalling

By Fr. George W. Rutler Fr. George W. Rutler is pastor of St. Michael’s church in New York City. He is the author of many books including Principalities and Powers: Spiritual Combat 1942-1943 (South Bend, IN: St. Augustine’s Press) and Hints of Heaven (Sophia Institute Press). His latest books are He Spoke To Us (Ignatius, 2016); The Stories of Hymns (EWTN Publishing, 2017); and Calm in Chaos (Ignatius, 2018). Truths become truisms by being true. Shakespeare may have got some of his Aristotle through Ben Jonson; but, in any case, he has Polonius quoting the philosopher’s truism about night following …

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The Return to Innocence

Auguste Meyrat is an English teacher and department chair at The Colony High School in North Texas. He has a BA in Arts and Humanities from University of Texas at Dallas and an MA in Humanities from the University of Dallas. With the continued normalization of vice in modern life, the idea of preserving or recovering innocence seems somewhat irrelevant. For most people, a return to innocence is more likely to bring to mind a new age hit single from the nineties than a serious societal concern. Today, only a few parents (usually of the Mormon or traditional Catholic variety) …

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Two Paths to Hell

By Regis Nicoll Regis Nicoll is a retired nuclear engineer and a fellow of the Colson Center who writes commentary on faith and culture. His new book is titled Why There Is a God: And Why It Matters. Dear Swillpit, The sure way to Hell is by a series of incremental adjustments so small, and seemingly innocuous, that earthlings never notice they are woefully off course until they find themselves aboard Charon’s skiff heading for the opposite shore. A believer who turns against our Adversary in a moment of anger or doubt is just as likely to turn back when …

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St. Michael’s Miraculous

How The Archangel Powerfully Dedicated His Own Basilica St. Michael the Archangel miraculously appeared four times in the following story, therefore dedicating his own basilica, the Sanctuary of San Michele Arcangelo. St. Michael’s First Apparition Between the third and eighth centuries, legend says that while a wealthy man named Gargano tended his animals, one of his bulls escaped and wandered off alone. Angered at finding the bull grazing by himself in front of a cave, he shot a poisoned arrow at it. The arrow then turned around and hit him! Gargano was so disturbed that he told the bishop about his …

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The Numerous Uses of Holy Water

“I have become all things to all, to save at least some” (1 Cor. 9:22) basically describes her life as writer, homemaker, friend and sister, wife, and mother of 2 spunky children, all for the sake of Gospel joy. She received her BA in Theology, Catechetics/Youth Ministry, and English Writing from Franciscan University of Steubenvile. Her life mottos are Ad Majoram Dei Gloriam and “Without complaint, everything shall I suffer for in the love of God, nothing have I to fear” (St. Teresa Margaret of the Sacred Heart). She is Pennsylvanian by birth, Californian by heart, and in Colorado for …

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15 Heresies and the Manly Saints Who Fought Them

The history of the Catholic Church is full of all sorts of heresies that have assailed the truths of the faith.  From the earliest days of the Gnostics and Docetists all the way down to the Jansenists and Quietists of later centuries, it seems there has never been a shortage of heretical thought. But in each age, God has brought forth bold and courageous men to combat each one.  These warrior saints gave their life in service to Christ and His Church in their own way, either as martyrs, confessors, or simply as servants to others for the sake of …

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The True Presence: Eucharistic Miracles Over the Centuries for Corpus Christi

The ‘Miracle of Lanciano’ — the relic of the miraculous Host is shown — continues to fascinate Catholics the world over. (Wikipedia/public domain) Culture of Life |  Jun. 20, 2019 The True Presence: Eucharistic Miracles Over the Centuries for Corpus Christi Lanciano might be the most famous of all Eucharistic miracles, but there have been many over the centuries, including recent ones. Joseph Pronechen During the middle of the eighth century, a Basilian monk who was more oriented toward science than faith had persistent doubts about the reality of the bread and wine becoming Christ’s true body and true blood at …

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What does the Bible really say about Mary, the Mother of the Messiah?

Paul Senz recently graduated from the University of Portland with his Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry. He lives in Oregon with his family. Dr. Brant Pitre is Distinguished Research Professor of Scripture at the Augustine Institute in Denver, Colorado. He earned his Ph.D. in Theology from the University of Notre Dame, specializing in the study of the New Testament and ancient Judaism. The author of several acclaimed books for both popular and academic readers, his latest is Jesus and the Jewish Roots of Mary: Unveiling the Mother of the Messiah (Image Books, 2018). This book details the biblical foundations for …

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The Strange Case of Dr. Biden and Mr. Hyde

Fr. George W. Rutler is pastor of St. Michael’s church in New York City. He is the author of many books including Principalities and Powers: Spiritual Combat 1942-1943 (South Bend, IN: St. Augustine’s Press) and Hints of Heaven (Sophia Institute Press). His latest books are He Spoke To Us (Ignatius, 2016); The Stories of Hymns (EWTN Publishing, 2017); and Calm in Chaos (Ignatius, 2018). Pictured above, former vice president and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks to a crowd at a Democratic National Committee event at Flourish in Atlanta on June 6, 2019, in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo credit: Dustin …

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Catholic Socialism Isn’t Catholic

My readership and the traditionalists in my parish exploded at the recent Catholic Herald article, titled “The Catholic turn to socialism is something to celebrate.” I am surrounded by socialists at work and have a lot of time for those with their hearts in the right place, especially regarding social justice. That said, I thought I would give Jose Mena, the “young Catholic socialist” who is mainly known on Twitter, a fair hearing and a brotherly critique. My political views have been described as a sort of medieval libertarianism, so I was delighted when I could say that I was …

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