The Return to Innocence

Auguste Meyrat is an English teacher and department chair at The Colony High School in North Texas. He has a BA in Arts and Humanities from University of Texas at Dallas and an MA in Humanities from the University of Dallas. With the continued normalization of vice in modern life, the idea of preserving or recovering innocence seems somewhat irrelevant. For most people, a return to innocence is more likely to bring to mind a new age hit single from the nineties than a serious societal concern. Today, only a few parents (usually of the Mormon or traditional Catholic variety) …

Continue Reading

Tension Between Unity and Truth

By Kathleen Curran Sweeney Kathleen Curran Sweeney holds a Master’s degree in Theological Studies in Marriage and Family from the John Paul II Institute in Washington, DC, an M.A. in History from the University of Washington, and a B.A. from Seattle University. She has published articles on pro-life topics, bioethics, theology, education, and history. The crisis facing the Church at this time has challenged the faith of countless Catholics in the durability of the Rock, which is the Church as promised by Christ. In an effort to avoid precisely this loss of trust, many in the hierarchy went to extraordinary …

Continue Reading

Abortion Induces Moral Relativism

David G. Bonagura, Jr. teaches classical languages at St. Joseph’s Seminary, New York. He is the author of Steadfast in Faith: Catholicism and the Challenges of Secularism (Cluny Media). Two elderly priests I know have offered complementary insights into our current cultural crisis: “Social engineering is preceded by verbal engineering,” and “Those who win the language wars win the culture wars.” Language carefully hones, shapes—or distorts—our culture. And, since language is our medium for comprehension, our use of language directly impacts our ability to know the truth. Today abortion supporters are using language in unprecedented ways that sickens our culture …

Continue Reading

Why have Catholics in the UK and US been leaving the Church since Vatican II?

Dr. Adam A. J. DeVille is associate professor and chairman of the Department of Theology-Philosophy, University of Saint Francis (Fort Wayne, IN) and author of Orthodoxy and the Roman Papacy (University of Notre Dame, 2011). Theologian and sociologist Stephen Bullivant says a big part of his argument in Mass Exodus is “that the ‘social architecture’ that had sustained and strengthened Catholic life and identity was well on the road to passing away by the time the Council came along.” Stephen Bullivant is Professor of Theology and the Sociology of Religion at St. Mary’s University in London, where is also Director of …

Continue Reading

California Borrowed $3 Billion for Embryonic Stem Cell Research in 2004. It Hasn’t Cured a Single Patient

Bioethics   Wesley Smith   Jul 5, 2019   |   5:34PM    Sacramento, CA Back in 2004, the university-biotech complex and its camp followers in the media and Hollywood convinced California voters to borrow $3 Billion to establish the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). Its purpose was to pay for embryonic stem-cell and human-cloning research over which the federal-government imposed funding restrictions. The campaign promised cures, and sold itself as a way to defy Bush’s modest embryonic stem-cell federal-funding restrictions. Fifteen years later, the money is running out — and whaddya know? It turns out the promises were …

Continue Reading

The Shroud of Turin: Latest Study Deepens Mystery

Above, pilgrims visit the exposition of the Shroud of Turin in Turin, Italy, on April 18, 2015. Below, an exhibit on the shroud on Sept. 12, 2017. (Stefano Guidi / Shutterstock.com and Elena Castaldi Viora / Shutterstock.com) World |  Aug. 5, 2019 The Shroud of Turin: Latest Study Deepens Mystery. Researchers cast doubt on the findings of the controversial 1988 study. K.V. Turley A new French-Italian study on the Shroud of Turin throws doubt on what many thought was the definitive dating of the cloth believed by millions to be the burial cloth of Jesus Christ. This latest two-year study was …

Continue Reading

The Decline and Fall of Joshua Harris

The apostasy of the famed Christian author illustrates the need for a more Catholic anthropology. Sophia Feingold In 1952, during the height of an era hailed retrospectively as one of American wholesomeness, a movie and two recordings introduced a new song: When I fall in love it will be forever, Or I’ll never fall in love. In a restless world like this is Love is ended before it’s begun, And too many moonlight kisses Seem to cool in the warmth of the sun. When I give my heart it will be completely, Or I’ll never give my heart; And the …

Continue Reading

U.S. Bishops Approve the Pope’s Capital Punishment Ban

Sæva indignatio. Few writers in the history of English letters could express “savage indignation” at human folly as did Jonathan Swift who wrote those words for his own epitaph. Our times give ample opportunity to empathize with him, and that is never more so than when clerics get together in large numbers. Bishops have many daunting responsibilities and, if they are reasonable, they are not fleet of foot to beat a path to synods and conferences and plenary sessions and other impositions on their august office. Their patience in such meetings is exemplary, and so lesser souls should be patient …

Continue Reading

Is American Law Still Concerned with Justice?

Recent news stories make one wonder if our legal system is abandoning our traditional Anglo-American principles of justice and instead becoming increasingly unreasonable, unprincipled, and allowing itself to become a tool for furthering political bias, revenge-seeking, and “making examples.” We can start off with the spectacle of the two-year-long investigation of the 2016 Trump presidential campaign for something that is not even a crime: collusion (supposedly with Russia to influence the election). The spectacle of various people being charged with questionable “process crimes”—such as lying to investigators—and the procuring of convictions via plea bargains as a result of threats and …

Continue Reading

Magisterial Liberalism by Ed Condon

Pride month has once again come and gone. As in previous years, entire sections of major cities were given over to parades and festivals celebrating the rainbow of sexual preferences, complete with corporate backing and municipal blessing. Any quick survey of images from the Pride parades will show, among the leather daddies and drag queens, a number of revelers wearing miters, wielding rosaries, and cloaking their cause in satirical imagery of the Church. Indeed, it is the Church that is now the last, albeit sometimes unwilling, institutional holdout against the tide of the LGBT political agenda. On Monday, the New …

Continue Reading