‘Miraculous’ Novena to Protect From Papal Confusion

Faithful Catholics will be praying during the month of November in the hope that Pope Francis will uphold Church teaching. Across the world, the faithful have been scandalized by the Amazon Synod in Rome. The release of the synod’s final document has been heavily criticized by bishops and faithful alike for its focus on liberation theology, its pushing of paganism and women’s ordination, and for the ensuing confusion that it’s created.  Though synod fathers are recommending these changes, it is up to Pope Francis to decide if and how they will be incorporated into the Church. How he will implement these recommendations will be outlined in …

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Cardinal Robert Sarah: A Prophetic Voice for the Catholic Church

Father Scalia grew up in the Diocese of Arlington and attended the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts.  He then studied theology at the Pontifical Gregorian University and the Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas in Rome.  Since his ordination in 1996 he has served as parochial vicar at several parishes and as pastor of Saint John the Beloved in McLean.  He currently serves as the Episcopal Vicar for Clergy and directs the permanent diaconate program.  He has written for various publications and is a frequent speaker on matters of faith and doctrine.  Father Scalia is the author …

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Pro-Abortion Ford Foundation Major Funder of Key Synod Organizations

Archbishop Roque Paloschi of Porto Velho, Brazil, addresses the media conference following the Synod assembly session Oct. 17 at the Vatican (Edward Pentin/National Catholic Register). INSET: Screen image captures from the Ford Foundation database detail grants given to the Indigenous Council of Roraima, COICA, COIAB and CIMI between 2006-2018. Pro-Abortion Ford Foundation Major Funder of Key Synod Organizations The Register has learned that organizations belonging to REPAM, which has held the primary role in organizing the synod’s proceedings, have received millions of dollars in grants from the U.S. foundation. Edward Pentin VATICAN CITY — A missionary council for indigenous peoples …

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What Kind of “Believers”?

George Weigel is Distinguished Senior Fellow of Washington, D.C.’s Ethics and Public Policy Center, where he holds the William E. Simon Chair in Catholic Studies. This past June I was in the Munich area for four days, giving a public lecture on Evangelical Catholicism and doing a lot of media interviews. My hosts were exceptionally gracious, but it was also obvious that the Catholic Church in what was once Germany’s most intensely Catholic region is in terrible shape. The numbers tell the tale. The parish in whose rectory I stayed has some 10,000 parishioners—which is to say, the pastor knows that …

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Balderdash on the Tiber

George Weigel is Distinguished Senior Fellow of Washington, D.C.’s Ethics and Public Policy Center, where he holds the William E. Simon Chair in Catholic Studies. Today’s first reading is from an explication of the academic program of the reconfigured Pontifical John Paul II Theological Institute for Marriage and Family Sciences by Msgr. Pierangelo Sequeri, the institute’s rector (translation provided by the institute): The recomposition of the thought and practice of faith with the global covenant of man and woman is now, with all evidence, a planetary theological space for the epochal remodeling of the Christian form; and for the reconciliation of …

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Historical Clarity and Today’s Catholic Contentions

George Weigel is Distinguished Senior Fellow of Washington, D.C.’s Ethics and Public Policy Center, where he holds the William E. Simon Chair in Catholic Studies. One of the curiosities of the 21st-century Catholic debate is that many Catholic traditionalists (especially integralists) and a high percentage of Catholic progressives make the same mistake in analyzing the cause of today’s contentions within the Church—or to vary the old fallacy taught in Logic 101, they think in terms of post Concilium ergo propter Concilium (everything that’s happened after the Council has happened because of the Council). And inside that fallacy is a common misreading …

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Looking for Schism in All the Wrong Places

Michael Warren Davis is the editor of Crisis magazine and host of The Crisis Point podcast. Pope Francis boldly declared last week that he’s unafraid of “pseudo-schismatics”: a clique of (mostly American) rigorist prelates and journalists whom Francis regards as a kind of loyal opposition to his papacy. But why should he have been afraid to begin with? A pseudo-schismatic is, by definition, not a schismatic. Pontiffs need no more fear pseudo-schismatics than exorcists need fear little boys who dress up as Harry Potter for Halloween—or, as the Holy Father might call them, pseudo-sorcerers. Or maybe I’ve misinterpreted him. Francis …

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Viganò Speaks: the “Infiltration” Is Real

Julia Meloni writes from the Pacific Northwest. She holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Yale and a master’s degree in English from Harvard. Jonah began his journey through the city, and when he had gone only a single day’s walk announcing, “Forty days more and Nineveh shall be overthrown,” the people of Nineveh believed God; they proclaimed a fast and all of them, great and small, put on sackcloth.  When the news reached the king of Nineveh, he rose from his throne, laid aside his robe, covered himself with sackcloth, and sat in ashes. (Jonah 3:4-6) A year after his …

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The Courage of Bishop Schneider

Jonathan B. Coe writes from the Pacific Northwest. Before being received into the Catholic Church in 2004, he served in pastoral ministry in rural Alaska and in campus ministry at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. Bad bishops are hardly a novelty in the history of the Church. Historians estimate that, when the Arian heresy rocked Christendom in the fourth century, four out of five bishoprics succumbed to apostasy. When Henry VIII ordered England’s bishops to swear the oath of succession, all of them complied—all, save one. For his refusal to abandon his allegiance to the Pope, Bishop John Fisher …

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Meet the New Faculty at the John Paul II Institute

Those who are dismayed by the dramatic transformation of the John Paul II Institute for Marriage and Family in Rome can find no comfort in the newest faculty appointments. Longtime faculty members such as Livio Melina and Stanislaw Grygiel have been fired and the Institute’s mission has been redefined under the leadership of Archbishop Paglia, the new Grand Chancellor. Fr. Maurizio Chiodi has joined the faculty this fall. He’s scheduled to teach a seminar called “Conscience and Discernment: Text and Context of Chapter 8 of Amoris Laetitia.” Thus, as expected, Amoris will move to the center stage at the Institute; …

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